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FHS MCJROTC would like welcome

our new Sr Marine Instructor,

Sergeant Major Jason Kappen.

 

Pvt Kappen attended basic training in June 1990 where he was meritoriously promoted to PFC.  PFC Kappen attended both MCT and SOI, where he was meritoriously promoted to LCpl.  In December of 1990 LCpl Kappen executed orders to 2nd Light Armored Infantry Battalion.

Pvt Kappen attended basic training in June 1990 where he was meritoriously promoted to PFC.  PFC Kappen attended both MCT and SOI, where he was meritoriously promoted to LCpl.  In December of 1990 LCpl Kappen executed orders to 2nd Light Armored Infantry Battalion.

In December of 1990, LCpl Kappen was deployed to Saudi Arabia in support of Operation Desert Shield, and later participated in Operation Desert Storm.  In June of 1991 LCpl Kappen returned to CONUS.  In October of 1992 he was promoted to Corporal.  In August of 1993 Cpl Kappen left for a Mediterranean Float with the 22nd MEU.  While on the deployment he participated in Operation Restore Hope in Somalia.  In February, 1994 Cpl Kappen was promoted to the rank of Sergeant.  After returning from deployment Sgt Kappen received orders to LAV Test Directorate in Yuma, Arizona.

Sgt Kappen checked into Light Armored Vehicle Test Directorate (LAV-TD), in November 1994.  While at LAV-TD, Sgt Kappen tested several upgrades to the Light Armored Vehicles, including the thermal sight and Applique Armor.  In January 1998 Sgt Kappen executed orders to MCRD San Diego.

Sgt Kappen attended class 2-98 and was assigned to Golf Company.  During his second cycle he was reassigned to Fox Company.  Sgt Kappen was promoted to SSgt in Dec 1998.  SSgt Kappen completed six cycles as a drill instructor and three as a senior drill instructor.  In June of 2000 SSgt Kappen transferred to RTR S-3, to serve as the training chief.  In March of 2001 SSgt Kappen executed orders to 1st Light Armored Recon (LAR) Battalion.

While at LAR, SSgt Kappen was assigned to Delta Company where he filled both 1stSgt and Company Gunnery Sergeant billets.  In June of 2002 SSgt Kappen deployed with the 11th MEU.  Returning from deployment in Dec 2002, SSgt Kappen prepared the company to deploy to Kuwait as the fly away company for the Bn to support Operation Iraqi Freedom.  Upon returning to the states, SSgt Kappen was assigned as the Assistant Operations Chief.  SSgt Kappen was promoted to GySgt in Sept 2003.  GySgt Kappen was sent to OIF II as the Assistant Ops Chief.  While in OIF II GySgt Kappen was appointed as the Iraqi Nation Guard SNCOIC for the LAR area of Operations, and as the Information Operation SNCOIC for LAR Bn.  In January 2005 GySgt Kappen executed orders to MCRD San Diego.

After completing Drill Instructor school GySgt Kappen was assigned to Fox Company where he served as chief drill instructor for five cycles.  GySgt Kappen was then assigned as the Battalion Drill Master for Second Recruit Training Battalion.  GySgt Kappen was selected to 1stSgt and received orders to Officer Candidate School.

1stSgt Kappen was assigned as 1stSgt for Charlie Company, Officer Candidates School where he completed 6 OCC companies.  He was transferred to H&S Company for the summer where he received and executed orders to 3rd Battalion 2d Marines.

1stSgt Kappen assumed duties as the first sergeant for Kilo Company, and was immediately sent to Haiti to meet up with the battalion conducting disaster relief operations.   1stSgt Kappen prepared the company and deployed to Afghanistan.  After returning from deployment 1stSgt Kappen attended the Senior Enlisted Academy of the Navy in New Port Rhode Island.  Upon graduation in February 2012, 1stSgt Kappen received and executed orders assume duties as the company first sergeant of Headquarters Company 2d Marine Regiment. 

In November of 2012 1stSgt Kappen was selected to Sergeant Major and received orders to assume the billet as the Sergeant Major for 3d Marine Special Operations Support Battalion, Marine Special Operations Command.  In June of 2015 SgtMaj Kappen was assigned duties as the SgtMaj for VMFA (AW)242 in Iwakuni Japan, and in August of 2016, SgtMaj Kappen was hand selected to assume the duties as the SgtMaj for VMFA-121.  From December 2018 until his retirement in June of 2020, SgtMaj Kappen was assigned as Base Sergeant Major for MCAS Futenma and acting SgtMaj Marine Corps Installations Command.  In July of 2020 SgtMaj Kappen assumed responsibilities as the Senior Military Instructor for Franklin High School.

SgtMaj Kappen is married with two children.  His personal awards include Meritorious Service Medal, Navy and Marine Corps Commendation medal with Silver Star in lieu of sixth award, Navy Achievement medal and Combat action ribbon with two gold stars in lieu of third award.

McKenna Menedis

Cadet McKenna Menedis is a 2018 graduate who served  in the FHS MCJROTC program.  She is currently  serving our country in the United States Navy.

This Week In Marine

Corps History

Welcome Packet

Please click buttons below to be taken to parent & student welcome packets

Welcome Packet

Please click buttons below to be taken to parent & student welcome packets

This Week In Marine

Corps History

  • Nov. 5, 1915: Maj. Smedley D. Butler, one of only 19 service members to be awarded the Medal of Honor twice, captured the stronghold at Fort Capois, Haiti, according to the This Day in History website. Ultimately, Butler's force of 26 Marines managed to take the fort, but not before having to escape an ambush while enroute to obtain reinforcements for the Fort's invasion. During the ambush, Butler's men killed 75 enemy Cacos; only one Marine was wounded and none killed.

  • Nov. 6, 1854: Birth of composer and conductor John Philip Sousa in Washington, D.C. Considered the "king of marches," Sousa - who was also the conductor and director of the Marine Band for 12 years - wrote some 136 marches, including "The Stars and Stripes Forever" and "Semper Fidelis." Sousa served a total of nearly 20 years in the Corps.

  • Nov. 7, 1942: Commandant of the Marine Corps Maj. Gen. Thomas Holcomb approves the organization of a women's reserve. Hundreds of women Marines, part of a headquarters company for the women's reserve, were billeted at Henderson Hall during World War II.

  • Nov. 8, 1990: President George H.W. Bush announces the planned addition of some 200,000 U.S. troops to those already deployed in support of Operation Desert Shield in the Persian Gulf area. The number of Marines in the area would be doubled by the addition of II Marine Expeditionary Force units from the Corps' east coast bases, and the 5th Marine Expeditionary Brigade from California. Within the next two months, some 90,000 Marines were in the objective area in support of the operation.

 

  • Nov. 9, 2004: The second day of combat operations in Fallujah, Iraq, as a U.S. Marine, British and Iraqi military-led offensive to rid the city of insurgents. The operation lasted seven weeks and involved some 13,000 coalition forces troops. At the time, the battle, dubbed Operation Phantom Fury and Operation Al-Fajr, is considered the heaviest urban combat U.S. Marines have experienced since the Battle of Hue City in Vietnam in 1968.

International Radiotelephony Spelling Alphabet (IRSA)

A - Alpha

B - Bravo

C - Charlie

D - Delta

E - Echo

F - Foxtrot

G - Golf

H - Hotel

I - India

J - Juliett

K - Kilo

L - Lima

M - Mike

N - November

O - Oscar

P - Papa

Q - Quebec

R - Romeo

S - Sierra

T - Tango

U - Uniform

V - Victor

W - Whiskey

X - X-ray

Y - Yankee

Z - Zulu

All of us have experienced the frustration of talking on a call with poor reception or noisy background and know how difficult it can be to communicate certain words under these conditions.  Because many words & letters sound the same under terrible listening conditions they can be easily misinterpreted.  Military leaders understand the importance of concise communication on the battlefield.  They know battles can be won or lost and lives saved or lost depending on information given & perceived.  The US military uses the same phonetic alphabet that was adopted by NATO in 1957 to communicate. Also known as the International Radiotelephony Spelling Alphabet, it is used by military, emergency & civil aviation organizations worldwide. Next time you find yourself struggling to communicate & have to spell out a word over a bad connection try using these....

This Week In Marine

Corps History

17 November 1918: The 4th Marine Brigade, as part of the 2d Division, American Expeditionary Force, began its march to the Rhine River, passing through Belgium andLuxembourg, as part of the American forces occupying a defeated Germany. 

20 November 1943: The 2d Marine Division, commanded by Major General Julian C. Smith, landed on Betio Island, Tarawa Atoll, Gilbert Islands. After seventy-six hours of bitter fighting during which almost 1,000 Marines died, and more than 2,000 were wounded, MajGen Smith declared the island secure.

20 November 1947: Major Bill Hendricks and Marine reservists started Toys For Tots in Los Angeles around this date. The Marine Corps Reserve adopted the program one year later.

22 November 1991: Colonel Gary Blair, CO, Marine Barracks GDE, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, and BGen George Walls Jr., CG/JTF, gave humanitarian needs for Haitian migrants during Operation "Gitmo."

23 November 1945: V Amphibious Corps relieved 5thMarDiv in Japan.

23 November 1950: Thanksgiving was celebrated in Korea with a temperature of 20 degrees below zero.

The Meaning Behind the 13

Folds of the American Flag

The Flag Itself

The portion of the flag denoting honor is the canton of blue containing the stars representing states our veterans served in uniform. The field of blue dresses from left to right and is inverted only when draped as a funeral cloth over the casket of a veteran who has served our country honorably in uniform. In the U.S. Armed Forces, at the ceremony of retreat, the flag is lowered, folded in a triangle and kept under watch throughout the night as a tribute to our nation's honored dead. The next morning it is brought out and, at a ceremony of reveille, flown high as a symbol of belief in the resurrection of the body.

Meaning Behind the 13 Folds

The flag-folding ceremony represents the same religious principles on which our great country was originally founded.

• The first fold of our flag is a symbol of life.

• The second fold is a symbol of our belief in eternal life.

• The third fold is made in honor and remembrance of the veteran departing our ranks, and who gave a portion of his or her life for the defense of our country to attain peace throughout the world.

• The fourth fold represents our weaker nature; as American citizens trusting in God, it is Him we turn to in times of peace, as well as in times of war, for His divine guidance.

• The fifth fold is a tribute to our country. In the words of Stephen Decatur, "Our country, in dealing with other countries, may she always be right, but it is still our country, right or wrong."

• The sixth fold is for where our hearts lie. It is with our heart that we pledge allegiance to the flag of the United States of America, and to the republic for which it stands, one nation under God, indivisible, with liberty and justice for all.

• The seventh fold is a tribute to our armed forces, for it is through the armed forces that we protect our country and our flag against all enemies, whether they be found within or without the boundaries of our republic.

• The eighth fold is a tribute to the one who entered into the valley of the shadow of death, that we might see the light of day, and to honor our mother, for whom it flies on Mother's Day.

• The ninth fold is a tribute to womanhood. It has been through their faith, love, loyalty and devotion that has molded the character of the men and women who have made this country great.

• The 10th fold is a tribute to father, who has also given his sons and daughters for the defense of our country since he or she was first born.

• The 11th fold represents the lower portion of the seal of King David and King Solomon and glorifies the God of Abraham, Isaac and Jacob.

• The 12th fold represents an emblem of eternity and glorifies God the Father, the Son and Holy Ghost.

• The 13th and last fold, when the flag is completely folded, the stars are uppermost, reminding us of our national motto, "In God We Trust."

Battle of the Inspection

By: Cadet Sgt Simone Tillman

This year, Franklin High’s MCJROTC program faced one of its most daunting challenges yet. They faced their bi-annual IG inspection. This inspection calls for mastery in drill, knowledge, and proper organization. While Franklin High is known for its Drill Team, all cadets including those who are strictly students and not drill team members had to participate. All cadets also had to participate in an array of questions to inform the inspectors of the knowledge the program has taught them throughout the years. While challenging, all cadets stepped up to the plate. But some showed out more than others.


To encourage cadets to try their best and put the most effort forward, the MCJROTC Boosters awarded Chick-fil-a gift cards to the two cadets  who obtained the highest scores. The highest was awarded thirty dollars, while second place was given twenty.

 

The second-place prize was awarded to runner-up Cadet Pvt Titilope Ibiwoye.  Titilope placed an extraordinary score in the questions & uniform components and demonstrated excellent discipline throughout the entirety of the inspection.
 

First place was awarded to Cadet Pvt Maximilian Kostyrkin. Max has demonstrated  exemplary knowledge and effort throughout his first year in the program. Though he is a new cadet, Max placed the highest score on his inspection and continues to grow.
 

The MCJROTC program passed this year’s IG inspection, and there is no one to thank other than the dedicated cadets who have shown up and performed time and time again.

FHS Drill Team Strikes Again
By Cadet Sgt Simone Tillman

The Franklin High School Drill Team is no stranger to harsh competition and close-call battles. But, at the 2020 Chesapeake Drill Competition, the fight for first place was closer than it’s ever been before. With only three schools competing, Chesapeake, Northeast, and Franklin, the competition was no longer about placing, but being the number one victor overall. Of course, while the team gets to bask in the glory of the victories, there are a number of people behind the scenes that truly make these wins possible.


The Chesapeake Drill Competition was purely for glory. It was no secret that each school competing would place. How they’d place however, was the real question. With immense practice and hard work, Franklin High was able to strike again, winning first place overall for the second time this season. Notwithstanding, it was an incredibly tight race and Franklin did not place first in every category. The first-place trophies were scattered all across the board, with mostly Northeast and Franklin taking home the gold. By the end of the competition no one was completely sure who had won, with the scores being so tight. Northeast had won first place for both color guard and inspection, while Franklin won first for both unarmed and armed platoons. These were all high-scoring categories when it came to the final score, but Franklin still seemed to end up on top.

How was this seemingly impossible victory obtained? The obvious answers would be the daily practices before school, or the dedication of hardworking drill team members and staff. But in reality, this win was in part due to the non-drill team members who took the time to come along on  the

trip and help out. Cadets like Elijah Blackman, Christopher Wheeler, and Karon Brown are the unsung heroes of Franklin High’s Drill Team. Not only did they wake up at 5 a.m. on a Saturday morning for a competition they wouldn’t even compete in, but they were the liveliest out of all. The extra hands on deck were incredibly useful and became quite the necessity when things got chaotic. They had such a great time that Cadet Blackman left saying he’d be at the next drill practice ready to join the team. Without the immense help from the non-drill team cadets and the FHS Drill Boosters, there’s no telling where the drill team would be today. With regionals around the corner, there’s no stopping for the team anytime soon. But why would they stop? A family as tight as this one will reach every goal they strive for. And they’ll either reach it together or not reach it at all.

FHS Drill Team Strikes Again
By Cadet Sgt Simone Tillman

BENEFITS OF MARINE CORPS JROTC PROGRAM

Since its inception in 1916, the JROTC program has been viewed as a strong program that provides youth with much-needed skills in citizenship and leadership. Additionally, numerous studies have shown that students who participate in JROTC programs have better attendance, grades, and graduation rates relative to students who were in general academic programs. Principals and school administrators also maintain positive attitudes toward JROTC because these programs:

• Motivate students to learn.

• Foster a disciplined and constructive learning environment. 

• Instill essential skills like time organization, responsibility, goal setting, and teamwork.​

MARINE CORPS JROTC RESULTS

"The effects of the Marine Corps JROTC program reach far beyond the classroom and into the community in developing character, leadership, and civic responsibility in tens of thousands of America's kids. Marine Corps JROTC at its essence is a character education program. The program keeps kids in school, helps them find their way during the turbulent teenage years, and assists them in becoming productive members of their community. Our program produces young men and women who are ready to accept the responsibilities as well as the privileges of citizenship. We are rightfully proud of our contribution to America's future and thankful for the dedicated instructors, staff, school administrators, and communities whose hard work and commitment make the program's success possible."​

LEADERSHIP TRAITS

Justice:  Giving reward and punishment according to the merits of the case in question.  The ability to administer a system of rewards and punishments impartially and consistently.

Judgement:  The ability to weigh facts and possible courses of action in order to make sound decisions.

Dependabililty:  The certainty of proper performance of duty.

Integrity:  Uprightness of character and soundness of moral principles. The quality of truthfulness and honesty.

Decisiveness:  Ability to make decisions promptly and to announce them in a clear, forceful manner.
 
Tact:  The ability to deal with others in a manner that will maintain good relations and avoid offense. More simply stated, tact is the ability to say and do the right thing at the right time.
 
Initiative:  Taking action in the absence of orders.

Endurance:  The mental and physical stamina measured by the ability to withstand pain, fatigue, stress, and hardship.
 
Bearing:  Creating a favorable impression in carriage, appearance, and personal conduct at all times.

Unselfishness:  Avoidance of providing for one’s own comfort and personal advancement at the expense of others.

Courage:  Courage is a mental quality that recognizes fear of danger or criticism, but enables a Marine to proceed in the face of danger with calmness and firmness.

Knowledge:  Understanding of a science or an art. The range of one’s information, including professional knowledge and understanding of your Marines.

Loyalty:  The quality of faithfulness to country, Corps, unit, seniors, subordinates and peers.
 
Enthusiasm:  Motivation is Contagious\

LEADERSHIP PRINCIPLES

Know Yourself and Seek Self Improvement

- This principle of leadership should be developed by the use of leadership traits. Evaluate yourself by using the leadership traits and determine your strengths and weaknesses.

 

Be Technically and Tactically Proficient

- A person who knows their job thoroughly and possesses a wide field of knowledge. Before you can lead, you must be able to do the job.

 

Know Your People and Look Out For Their Welfare

- A leader must make a conscientious effort to observe his Marines and how they react to different situations.

 

Keep Your Personnel Informed

- To promote efficiency and morale, a leader should inform the Marines in his unit of all happenings and give reasons why things are to be done.

 

Set The Example

- A leader who shows professional competence, courage and integrity sets high personal standards for himself before he can rightfully demand it from others.

 

Ensure That the Task Is Understood, Supervised, and Accomplished

- Leaders must give clear, concise orders that cannot be misunderstood, and then by close supervision, ensure that these orders are properly executed.

 

Train Your Marines and Sailors as a Team

- As a leader, you must insist on teamwork from your Marines. Train, play and operate as a team. Be sure that each Marine knows his/her position and responsibilities within the team framework.

 

Make Sound and Timely Decisions

- The leader must be able to rapidly estimate a situation and make a sound decision based on that estimation. 

 

Develop a Sense of Responsibility Among Your Subordinates

- Give your Marines them the opportunity for professional development. Assigning tasks and delegating authority promotes mutual confidence and respect between leader and subordinates.

 

Employ Your Command within its Capabilities

- A leader must have a thorough knowledge of the tactical and technical capabilities of the command. Successful completion of a task depends upon how well you know your unit’s capabilities.

 

Seek Responsibilities and Take Responsibility

- For professional development, you must actively seek out challenging assignments. You must use initiative and sound judgment when trying to accomplish jobs that are required by your grade.

MARINE CORPS CORE VALUES

By understanding the Marine Corps core values of Honor, Courage, and Commitment, you will understand how these ideals help MCJROTC cadets become better citizens.

Honor is the quality that guides Marines to exemplify ethical and moral behavior.

Courage is a mental quality that recognizes fear of danger or criticism, but enables a leader to proceed in the face of it with calmness and firmness. It is a quality of mind that gives leaders control over fear, enabling them to accept responsibility and to act properly in a threatening situation.

Commitment means the dedication to carry out all unit tasks and to serve the values of the country, the MCJROTC, and the unit. Commitment leads to the highest discipline for your unit and yourself.

In addition to these ideals, your values must also be applied to other areas. These might be ideas such as punctuality, truthfulness, and fidelity. You must also value the outer signs of these ideals, such as having good personal hygiene and a spotless uniform. Last, but by no means least important, you must apply your values to friends, family, and fellow cadets.​

\\

"The effects of the Marine Corps JROTC program reach far beyond the classroom and into the community in developing character, leadership, and civic responsibility in tens of thousands of America's kids. Marine Corps JROTC at its essence is a character education program. The program keeps kids in school, helps them find their way during the turbulent teenage years, and assists them in becoming productive members of their community. Our program produces young men and women who are ready to accept the responsibilities as well as the privileges of citizenship. We are rightfully proud of our contribution to America's future and thankful for the dedicated instructors, staff, school administrators, and communities whose hard work and commitment make the program's success possible."​

Source - https://www.mcjrotc.marines.mil/About/

This Week In Marine

Corps History

17 May 1962: The 3rd MEU landed in Thailand, easing communist pressure.

18 May 1902: Marines from the USS Ranger landed in Panama City to protect Americans.

19 May 1927: The 11th Marine Regiment arrived at Esteli, Nicaragua, for garrison duty.

20 May 1803: Marines participated in the raid on Tripoli.

20 May 1906: Major John A. Lejeune embarked his battalion for duty in Panama.

21 May 1846: A Marine regiment formed for duty with General Winfield Scott's Army in Mexico.

22 May 1912: First Lieutenant Alfred A. Cunningham, the first Marine officer to be assigned to "duty in connection with aviation" by Major General Commandant William P. Biddle, reported for aviation training at the Naval Aviation Camp at Annapolis, Maryland, and Marine aviation had its official beginning.

 

23 May 1988: The V-22 Osprey, the world's first production tilt-rotor aircraft, made its debut during rollout ceremonies at Bell Helicopter Textron's Arlington, Texas, facility. More than 1,000 representatives from the military, industry, and media, gathered to hear various speakers, including Gen Alfred Gray, Commandant of the Marine Corps, praise the versatile rotor craft designed to meet the needs of 21st Century battlefields.

24 May 1900: Marines landed at Taku, China, to establish Legation Guard at Peking.

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FHSMCJROTC would like welcome

our new Sr Marine Instructor,

Sergeant Major Jason Kappen.

NEWS

Pvt Kappen attended basic training in June 1990 where he was meritoriously promoted to PFC.  PFC Kappen attended both MCT and SOI, where he was meritoriously promoted to LCpl.  In December of 1990 LCpl Kappen executed orders to 2nd Light Armored Infantry Battalion.

Pvt Kappen attended basic training in June 1990 where he was meritoriously promoted to PFC.  PFC Kappen attended both MCT and SOI, where he was meritoriously promoted to LCpl.  In December of 1990 LCpl Kappen executed orders to 2nd Light Armored Infantry Battalion.

In December of 1990, LCpl Kappen was deployed to Saudi Arabia in support of Operation Desert Shield, and later participated in Operation Desert Storm.  In June of 1991 LCpl Kappen returned to CONUS.  In October of 1992 he was promoted to Corporal.  In August of 1993 Cpl Kappen left for a Mediterranean Float with the 22nd MEU.  While on the deployment he participated in Operation Restore Hope in Somalia.  In February, 1994 Cpl Kappen was promoted to the rank of Sergeant.  After returning from deployment Sgt Kappen received orders to LAV Test Directorate in Yuma, Arizona.

Sgt Kappen checked into Light Armored Vehicle Test Directorate (LAV-TD), in November 1994.  While at LAV-TD, Sgt Kappen tested several upgrades to the Light Armored Vehicles, including the thermal sight and Applique Armor.  In January 1998 Sgt Kappen executed orders to MCRD San Diego.

Sgt Kappen attended class 2-98 and was assigned to Golf Company.  During his second cycle he was reassigned to Fox Company.  Sgt Kappen was promoted to SSgt in Dec 1998.  SSgt Kappen completed six cycles as a drill instructor and three as a senior drill instructor.  In June of 2000 SSgt Kappen transferred to RTR S-3, to serve as the training chief.  In March of 2001 SSgt Kappen executed orders to 1st Light Armored Recon (LAR) Battalion.

While at LAR, SSgt Kappen was assigned to Delta Company where he filled both 1stSgt and Company Gunnery Sergeant billets.  In June of 2002 SSgt Kappen deployed with the 11th MEU.  Returning from deployment in Dec 2002, SSgt Kappen prepared the company to deploy to Kuwait as the fly away company for the Bn to support Operation Iraqi Freedom.  Upon returning to the states, SSgt Kappen was assigned as the Assistant Operations Chief.  SSgt Kappen was promoted to GySgt in Sept 2003.  GySgt Kappen was sent to OIF II as the Assistant Ops Chief.  While in OIF II GySgt Kappen was appointed as the Iraqi Nation Guard SNCOIC for the LAR area of Operations, and as the Information Operation SNCOIC for LAR Bn.  In January 2005 GySgt Kappen executed orders to MCRD San Diego.

After completing Drill Instructor school GySgt Kappen was assigned to Fox Company where he served as chief drill instructor for five cycles.  GySgt Kappen was then assigned as the Battalion Drill Master for Second Recruit Training Battalion.  GySgt Kappen was selected to 1stSgt and received orders to Officer Candidate School.

1stSgt Kappen was assigned as 1stSgt for Charlie Company, Officer Candidates School where he completed 6 OCC companies.  He was transferred to H&S Company for the summer where he received and executed orders to 3rd Battalion 2d Marines.

1stSgt Kappen assumed duties as the first sergeant for Kilo Company, and was immediately sent to Haiti to meet up with the battalion conducting disaster relief operations.   1stSgt Kappen prepared the company and deployed to Afghanistan.  After returning from deployment 1stSgt Kappen attended the Senior Enlisted Academy of the Navy in New Port Rhode Island.  Upon graduation in February 2012, 1stSgt Kappen received and executed orders assume duties as the company first sergeant of Headquarters Company 2d Marine Regiment. 

In November of 2012 1stSgt Kappen was selected to Sergeant Major and received orders to assume the billet as the Sergeant Major for 3d Marine Special Operations Support Battalion, Marine Special Operations Command.  In June of 2015 SgtMaj Kappen was assigned duties as the SgtMaj for VMFA (AW)242 in Iwakuni Japan, and in August of 2016, SgtMaj Kappen was hand selected to assume the duties as the SgtMaj for VMFA-121.  From December 2018 until his retirement in June of 2020, SgtMaj Kappen was assigned as Base Sergeant Major for MCAS Futenma and acting SgtMaj Marine Corps Installations Command.  In July of 2020 SgtMaj Kappen assumed responsibilities as the Senior Military Instructor for Franklin High School.

SgtMaj Kappen is married with two children.  His personal awards include Meritorious Service Medal, Navy and Marine Corps Commendation medal with Silver Star in lieu of sixth award, Navy Achievement medal and Combat action ribbon with two gold stars in lieu of third award.

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 Worth Everything Ever Wished For
Contributing Artist: Pacific*Atlantic
FHS MCJROTC
Franklin High School
12000 Reisterstown Rd,
Reisterstown, MD 21136